Using Oracle’s VirtualBox – A Review

Of late, I have been tinkering around with Ubuntu. The reason? I needed to work on a Python project, and wasn’t making much headway into it.

Being a Windows user, I was finding it difficult to install the required Python modules for my project. This was especially exasperating with SciPy, a library that’s a prerequisite for almost all Python programs. Its latest distribution, unfortunately, is compatible only with Linux.

At the same time, I was apprehensive of even touching Unix, since it’s always spelt doom for my PC. Dual-booting Windows with any Linux or Ubuntu distro had caused, in the past, many a computer to crash – right in front of my eyes.

Hence, I had to overcome my apprehensions, tap into the hitherto alien Unix environment, and work on my project from there –  whether I enjoyed it or not.

While scrolling the internet for solutions, I stumbled upon VirtualBox, a VM(Virtual Machine) software by Oracle. Upon going through a few tutorials, I decided to give it a go.

What’s a Virtual Machine?

A virtual machine is a software that allows emulation of an OS (operating system). This way, the user can control one OS, while working within another OS. You may think of it as a case of one OS nested within another.

It’s amusing to think, “What if I run a virtual machine within my virtual installation? Is infinite nesting of OSes allowed?”

Ideally, such an experiment would be possible. In reality, hardware limitations would render it futile, since emulation saps up a significant portion of the host OS’s resources, such as RAM and memory. The hardware has to be divided between itself and the nested (also called guest) OS, a situation very similar to a dual-boot option.

As an explanation, I shall now use this infographic.

 

It’s clear that with more number of OSes, each nested OS shall have very little computational power at its disposal. In fact, OS 7 is a mere shadow of C64 (Commodore 64), which is itself an obsolete system by today’s hardware standards, since the latter requires at least 64 KB of RAM to operate.

A review of the installation

Here’s one feature universally appreciated about VirtualBox – it allows hassle-free toggling between the guest and host OS (in my case, Ubuntu) – all with a simple click of the mouse button.

This is especially useful to me, since I’m a staunch Windows user, and can’t stand Ubuntu’s interface for too long. Sure, Ubuntu allows for quick development of program code, but when it comes to good UI (user interface), I feel that its developers should borrow some design tips from Windows 8.1, which is the OS currently installed on my PC.

In fact, here’s what it looks like, along with VirtualBox:

Since my hard drive has around 500 GB memory, and 6 GB RAM, I’ve found it convenient to run a fully installed (virtual) version of Ubuntu, with 20 GB memory and 1 GB RAM allocated to it.

So far, it’s working well for me, and am quite satisfied with it!

Related links 

The VirtualBox website:

https://www.virtualbox.org/

Installing Ubuntu within Windows using VirtualBox; a how-to guide:

http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/virtualbox

Sharing files between VirtualBox and host; a how-to guide:

https://www.technig.com/share-file-between-virtualbox-and-host/

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